Online Marketing: 16 Dos and Don’ts in Retargeting

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Online Marketing: 16 Dos and Don’ts in Retargeting

Retargeting is very easy to use, especially for online retailers, and can be a powerful tool if done right. We’ll show you ten great ideas to copy and six mistakes to avoid.

77 percent of all customers leave their shopping basket where they are, according to a study by market researchers from Ascend2 . 45 percent of B2B marketers think retargeting is the most effective digital advertising method.

Similar to SEO, email marketing and SEM, retargeting is one of the long-running digital advertising methods. But the signs have turned in the last few years. Retargeting is now often played out via Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and competes with other content in the feed. If you want to stop the user’s thumb while scrolling, you need cool ideas.

10 tips for retargeting

1. Address pain points directly

The user who receives a retargeting banner knows your company. Therefore, generic banners don’t make sense. It is much better if you do it like Hubspot and address specific problems that the user has in everyday life and that he can solve with your help. If the decisive argument is there, then maybe he will convert.

Hubspot, for example, addresses the time required to set up a CRM tool: set up in 25 seconds, but it saves 124 working hours a year.

2. The better, dynamic product image

Are the generic images from the product page really good for the small retargeting banner? An ambient image with the product in use may work better than a cropped view of the product alone. The Yoox online shop even renders the viewed items of clothing in retargeting with virtual models.

Neuromarketing has taught us that the state you achieve when you buy a new product is often perceived as more important than individual features or the price. You are cooler, healthier, more mobile, more carefree. This can also be illustrated in the picture.

Tip: Retargeting banners can also be a good test of which image on the product page converts better.

3. The conversion tables

Urgency is one of the best neuro-triggers out there. In the case of a product that has already been considered, the customer often does not need to obtain further information. So a time-limited special offer or a reference to only a few pieces left can help.

4. The smart voucher

Anyone can use a voucher. The smart voucher or discount is one that communicates a clear value and yet eats little of the margin. If you want to sell a hotel weekend, you can probably get over a free bottle of champagne in your room. Those who discount the individual product could link the discount to the newsletter registration.

5. Retargeting as upselling

Conversion is not the end of the journey. Does the purchased product need a cable or a stand? With the recognition of the user, the journey can be extended. This also applies to how-to content, i.e. material on how to use the product (for example in cooking recipes). This tactic may make it easier for the customer to set up a customer account.

The statistics provide important insights for the selection of the right complementary product: Which products do other customers like to buy together?

6. Welcome to the club

Existing customers are easier to convert. Use retargeting to remind your customers of a positive shopping experience from the past and use this as an opener for the presentation of new products.

7. The integrated retargeting architecture

You can only achieve good frequency control in retargeting if you keep all your channels under control. This is particularly difficult for resellers of advertising space when they play through affiliates. Anyone with a comprehensive retargeting strategy has good reason to think about marketing automation. And vice versa.

8. Channel-specific banners

Every website has its own design rules and this is especially true for the Facebook and Instagram, which are so popular in retargeting. According to its own information, the design platform 99Designs was able to increase its incremental turnover to 134 percent and at the same time reduce costs by a quarter by building 100 variants instead of the previous ten different layouts.

9. Content instead of sales

Of course there are users who don’t like retargeting. But these are mostly those who are afraid of their data or are bothered by bad ads. It’s time to turn the tables in the direction of inbound marketing. Simply apply for a free offer, such as a white paper or a test drive. Such ads are called lead-gen ads, because registration is required to use the free offer.

Linking and advertising additional information about the product viewed can also be the right “detour”. “This is what other users say about product XY.” Or: “Horst used our product XY so creatively.”

10. Churn prevention

And another variant of how you can deal with existing customers in retargeting: Talk to your newsletter subscribers specifically, especially if they haven’t clicked for a long time or even bought something. For example, conversion guru Neil Patel particularly liked an ad that reminded him that he had been an American Express customer for exactly four years. Including upgrade offer.

The 6 biggest mistakes in retargeting

The British marketing service E-Consultancy has summarized the six worst mistakes in retargeting :

1. Users who have already converted

Rubbing the promotion for new customers under the nose of existing customers and showing buyers that the great product they bought yesterday is already much cheaper today is not only a waste of advertising space, it also annoys loyal customers. The ID of the respective tracking pixel or other recognition features must be excluded when the user has converted, unless you have a clear upselling strategy.

2. No segmentation

Additional data points make retargeting really exciting. Which pages did the users visit other than the one on which the tracking pixel was set? Did they come from Google or type-in? Generic retargeting converts poorly.

3. Lack of creativity

Probably the most common mistake: Assuming that price and product image will fix it. Relevance is created through recognition but also through a cool call-to-action. And especially in fast social media, you need a strong visual incentive for users to look at the banner.

4. Underrated addition

Those who did not convert directly may need a little additional incentive. Calculate what the new customer acquisition is worth to you and divide the amount into media and promotion.

5. No frequency control

If you haven’t bought it after the third retargeting, you probably don’t want the product (or you already have it, but not from you). How about a complementary product, because there is probably interest in the product type.

6. False statistical twins

Those who do not segment properly can only expand their target group on a very generic level with statistical twins (lookalikes). And then the probability of additional conversions decreases.

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